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There is no better time than right now to review your super!


So by now we all know that Australian and global investment markets have fallen significantly, it’s on the news, in the papers and I’ve been publishing recent posts about it on LinkedIn.

What’s causing it?  Truth is, it doesn’t really matter.  Oil prices are down, there’s talk of China slowing, commodity prices are down and so forth.  Historically there is always something occurring on the world stage that can cause negativity in markets.  Investors start to worry, they sell their investments at low prices, lock in losses only to have someone come along, buy them up and enjoy the gains as things recover.


Warren Buffet, the world’s most famous stock market investor famously said, “The stock market is a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient”.

And we can see this today.  As I write this, global stock markets suffered a large decline over night, with the expectation being that the Australian market would follow this morning. Interestingly, the Australian market is actually up 1.5% today.  Why?  It’s because the bargain hunters (the patient) are snapping up terrific deals through direct investment or superannuation. That’s smart investing. That’s what brokers and fund managers do.  This is what your superannuation fund should do for you.

So what does this have to do with my superannuation?  Good question.  Nearly all super funds have some level of exposure to Australian stock markets.  The level of which really should be dependent upon your age, client profile, how close you are to retirement. 

In either case, smart investors are those that recognise cheap assets.  Superannuation is no different.  Now is the best time in over 10 years to grab some bargains and give your superannuation a real boost.   

How?  It’s simple.   Get your super reviewed and adjust the asset mix to suit and not just relying on the “default setting” that many funds use.

I have a number of information evenings planned for February and March.  An informal get together in my Newstead office where I’ll discuss the current state of play over a slice of pizza and a few refreshments.

Given the current opportunities with markets being low,  I am focusing on our information session set for Thursday 25th February at out Newstead Office.   I will specifically address how to take advantage of the market drop.  Click here to RSVP and find out more about the Pizza Business After Hours.


If you have a diary clash, I’m always available for an individual chat over a coffee in the office or via phone, Skype, email.

Andrew O’Brien and Hindsight Group Pty Ltd t/as Hindsight Wealth Pty Ltd (ABN 88 168 442 528) are Authorised Representatives of Synchron AFS Licence No 243313.”  Andrew O'Brien. FINANCIAL ADVISER. P 07 3852 3025  0403 156 625  E andrew@hindsightwealth.com Suite 4 / 30 Florence Street, Newstead QLD 4006.  

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